Not an Ironman

Wednesday night’s ride covered some of the ground of Sunday’s Ironman Wisconsin. We periodically saw orange route arrows taped onto the roads. We climbed 100 feet/mile, which doesn’t sound like a lot but is about the same rate of climbing as the Horribly Hilly Hundreds or the Death Ride. We rode 30 miles instead of over 100, but then, we did it after work. When Ironman participants ride these roads, they will do it after swimming 2.4 miles in open water. After riding 112 miles on these roads, they’ll run a marathon.

On the way to work the next morning, I saw green arrows marking the run route for Ironman. When I take a different route to work, I see swimmers (accompanied by kayaks) practicing on the swim route.

Will the Ironpeople have time to watch the sunset over these soybean fields?
I saw this sign on last Sunday’s ride. It captures the half-fast cycling ethos, even when we’re training for a century.

Sunday’s ride was a reminder of where the white people who settled this area came from. We met in Verona and rode through Frenchtown, Belleville, Monticello, and New Glarus. Of course, before them were the Ho-Chunk and their ancestors, the Mound Builders. The meet-up point was inaccessible due to road closures for Ironman, so I wandered a bit before finding a place to start. A few miles in, I joined the planned route. Twenty miles in, I saw the ride leader. Forty miles in, I stopped at a christian classic car show and saw a few more riders I recognized, but mostly I rode alone. You might wonder what christianity has to do with classic cars. I do. Old cars were parked at an angle around a one-block park. Very few people were looking at the cars. Most of them were in folding chairs listening to a preacher. I found the deep purple 1957 Chevy much more interesting.

I never tire of looking at contour farming.

ADude I follow wrote about riding alone and riding in groups, wondering which we prefer. My answer is “yes”. Riding in a group has the advantage that someone else can plan the route and you can follow a cue sheet. Riding alone has the advantage that you can go where your heart takes you and follow no plan; or have the fun of planning a route. A group lets you talk to people. Alone lets you be with your thoughts. A group give you the opportunity to draft behind someone and save energy. Alone means you can watch the scenery and not pay attention to the person in front of you. You can ride at your own pace. A quick pause here to run outside. The laundry is in the back yard but:

The laundry is hanging in the basement or in the dryer (and the rain has stopped), so back to riding. Somewhere in between those two is riding with a friend or two. I’ve been riding with this guy for about 45 years. This picture is from the 80s, when I was visiting back home from California and riding a borrowed bike. So ride alone, ride with a friend, ride with 100 friends. I don’t care. Just ride.

Half-fast in the mid 80s.
Can you spot them here, 25 years later?

Cyclocross commute

To get to work this morning, I had to dismount and carry my bike through this downed tree. That was the easy part.

The ride home was into a 20 mph headwind with a temperature of 40 degrees (32 km/h and 4.5 degrees C), with rain driven by that wind. Since last night’s ride for fun was in ideal conditions (70 degrees, low humidity, breezy), I have nothing more to say about that.

And to think that, three years ago, I did this for fun.

This is how we looked at lunchtime of a 103 mile ride in the rain at 40 degrees F. Still smiling. You can’t see the bread bags on Ally’s feet, as she didn’t have neoprene shoe covers. And, yes, Ed was crazy (or ill-prepared) enough to be riding in shorts. (Photo from CycleAmerica Facebook page.)

Speaking of fun, Cycle America will be riding coast-to-coast again in the summer of 2022. The trip leaves from Seattle on Father’s Day and arrives in Gloucester, MA on August 20. The total cost (which includes 3 meals/day on riding days, and a place to pitch your tent or a gym to lay your sleeping bag) is $7415 until June 18 (one year before departure). Meals are on your own on rest days (one per week) and you’re on your own if you stop for espresso or beer. You can stay in motels some nights if you need a bed. That costs extra. More information at CycleAmerica.com.

Patriotic Music

Today we celebrate the declaration of freedom of one group of white, male, landowning imperialists from the tyranny of another group of white, male landowning imperialists. (I’m writing this on 4 July, but you won’t see it until the 5th, since everything goes live at midnight. As usual, if you just read your email you won’t see/hear the music links, so click the title and open the page.)

Samuel Johnson has been quoted (by Boswell) as saying that “Patriotism is the last refuge of a scoundrel.” Our current president hugging and kissing a flag immediately comes to mind.

AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana

In the 1960s, the people who were the equivalent of Trump’s base today had a bumper sticker that said, “America: Love it or Leave it”. Soon another bumpersticker appeared reading, “America: Love is not Enough”. The triumvirate concluded with, “America: Fix it or Fuck it”. I wrote an essay in high school in which I chose the third and concluded, “In my life, I want to be the fixer.” The elderly version of me would say, “I don’t trust any philosophy that can fit on a bumper sticker.”

I have seen other blogs listing “patriotic music” we should listen to today. As I rambled through 50 miles of countryside this morning, a few patriotic tunes ran through my head, so here is my contribution to the day. First, a potential alternate national anthem. I am far from the first to suggest that.

Much music has been written for “important” people. Aaron Copland decided it was time for a fanfare for the common people. (The imagery in the video seems to have been chosen by someone who had a totally different idea of what Copland meant.)

When I heard Sonny Terry and Brownie McGee perform this song I had a new appreciation for the song and the harmonica, and of the benefits of growing up in a college town so I could see and hear them.

Even presidents who accomplished great things in their tenure can ultimately fail. I always liked this intro, even though the song had nothing to do with LBJ. With a band name like “The Electric Flag” (with the subtitle “An American Music Band”) I had to squeeze them in, with their rendition of this Howlin’ Wolf tune.

Bob Dylan had to make this posting, and this one, while always timely, seems especially so again, with a new generation taking the lead.

Too often in Dylan’s shadow, Phil Ochs was a genius in his own right. It’s hard to pick one song, but this is one that those who don’t listen closely can misconstrue (kinda like “Born in the USA” by Bruce Springsteen).

Richard and Mimi Fariña sang of (not) testifying before the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC). A live version was recorded at the Newport Folk Festival. I have it on vinyl (the posthumous album “Memories” – beware – the CD version is not the same) but all other versions I can find are a vastly inferior recording, so this is the original studio version, since digitizing my album is beyond my capability. The album was a Christmas present from my sister, who heard it playing at a record store. She told me that if I didn’t want it, she’d keep it. No way was I going to let her have it. It grew on me quickly and I still have it 53(?) years later.

Antonin Dvořák showed that European classical composers can be influenced by the US, not just vice versa. And who can resist a piece that opens with viola?

Much is made of the American Dream. I grew up learning about America as a melting pot; a rich stew enlivened by new additions. But the longer the stew steeps, the smaller the influence of those additions. My kids learned a song in elementary school that told them “My town is not a melting pot/My town is a salad bowl” – that our identities are lost if they are melted together. Folksinger Charlie King taught me that America truly is a melting pot – “The scum rises to the top and those on the bottom get burned.” (One might conclude that we have to stir things up every now and then.)

We tend to forget that “America” includes a huge land mass stretching from about 70 degrees north latitude to about 55 degrees south latitude. The United States is but a small part of America. In Spanish there is a term for people from the US – “estadounidense”, roughly “United Statesian”. English lacks such a term which encourages us to forget the rest of America and think of ourselves as Americans and everyone else as Other. And we conveniently forget that people were already here when it was “discovered”. Not to mention that many think of American as meaning “light-skinned and of European origin”.

Whose version of that dream will be realized? Whose version is snuffed out too soon? Los Lobos asks the question.

Early readers will miss the next link. I forgot it yesterday when I got home. Leadbelly sang of hypocrisy and segregation in “Bourgeois Blues”.

Before hip hop there was Gil Scott-Heron, who taught us that “The Revolution Will Not be Televised”. Sitting back and watching is not enough.

Now that I’m home and can look things up, this list could keep growing. I realize women are under-represented. But I will stay true to the theme (this being a bike blog, not a music blog) of what I thought of and sang on today’s ride – with this one exception. What if we had a president who sang along with the Freedom Singers instead of retweeting White Power? (Oh yeah, we did once.)

I don’t know which should close – Gil Scott-Heron or Sam Cooke – but it’s gonna be Cooke. He started as a gospel singer, became famous to white folks as a pop singer, but I think this was his greatest achievement. It continues to send chills down my spine.

A real American – an oak tree on this morning’s ride

What’s the score?

My local newspaper (the handling of which is deemed a low-risk vector for infection) interviewed a medical ethicist (whose work I know and respect) about the allocation of resources in a time of scarcity.

In other words, if there aren’t enough ventilators to go around, who gets one? How do we decide? I suddenly feel old. My mind totes up the score. I’m over 65. That’s bad. I rode my bike across the country at 65. That’s good. I have asthma. That’s bad. My asthma is well-controlled; requiring no medication in years except for once last month. That’s good. I work in health care. That’s good, for being someone who should be saved. That’s bad, for being someone who can stay home and stay well. I’m not just resting on my laurels as someone who rode across the country a couple of years ago. I rode the Horribly Hilly Hundreds last last year and am scheduled to ride the Death Ride this year. That’s good, isn’t it?

In other words, I don’t want to die yet. Most of us don’t. While I accept death as part of life and as something that will happen to me, not just everybody else, I don’t want it to be now, as part of this pandemic.

But this keeping score is scary. I don’t want to think about whether I deserve to live more than someone else. What’s the difference between a person with diabetes, coronary artery disease, and COPD; and a healthy person with no chronic diseases, but paraplegia? What about someone with quadriplegia who already uses a ventilator? Disability is not the same as chronic illness. Living with one or the other is not the same as dying.

There is a disability rights movement called Not Dead Yet. They have grappled with these questions for years. Their website contains a link to a paper from the Disability Rights and Education Fund addressing the question of rationing care. Not Dead Yet lists two primary goals: 1) opposing the legalization of assisted suicide and; 2) ensuring that withholding or withdrawal of life-support is truly voluntary.

On the other side of the assisted suicide debate are Death With Dignity and the Hemlock Society (which no longer exists. The death of the organization is chronicled by its founder here). They look at the notion of being able to choose the time and manner of our own death if we have a terminal condition. Not Dead Yet is concerned about the slippery slope of assisted suicide becoming euthanasia, and about the idea that some have more right to live than others.

While these questions are separate, they are often seen as intertwined. By “these questions”, I mean: 1) prioritizing care, 2) assisted suicide, and 3) euthanasia. Peter Ralston talks about the word “confused” as “fused with” (“con” from the Latin word for “with”, and “fuse” “to blend as if by melting together”). While I find no evidence that this is the literal root of the word, it is useful, when we are confused, to see if we are melting together things that we could tease apart and look at separately.

“I can’t think for you, you’ll have to decide…”

Some questions are easy to answer. If the disease has a choice between taking me or taking one of my kids, take me. I may have more to offer the world, but not as much as they do, with potentially 40 more years to do it in than I have.

Some questions already have rubrics. We have a scoring system in place to decide who gets a new liver when one becomes available. We may not always like the outcome, but it seems to work. In the same way, ethicists can design a rubric to decide who gets the ICU bed or the ventilator. We just don’t have the luxury of time in which to figure it out.

“Cross contamination” – what does that look like? Check out this Facebook video.
This is even better if you listen without watching.

Since I had trouble finding his name, I want it out there: J-L Cauvin.

Exile

My wife works from home. As her work is confidential and involves talking, I am exiled for the day. I was forced to go for a long bike ride. A popular route since I was on training wheels is to the town park in Paoli. Usually I refill my water bottles there. Not today. I wasn’t going to since I didn’t have a way to disinfect the handle, but that wasn’t an option.

The pump don’t work cuz the vandals took the handles.
The handle may have been removed to prevent spread of infection

Social distancing was easy. There was no one out there. I rode past a bunch of loons out on the lake. They are also adept at social distancing. Ducks hang out in groups, but loons are introverts. Only once did I see two close enough to get them in the same frame. After the ride, I went home to get the “real” camera and went back to take pictures. Loons are wily. They dive to hunt and may pop up anywhere. They tended to stay away from me when I had the camera out. If I quietly moved down the path to get closer, one would pop up in the spot I just left. If I focused on one in the distance, another would pop up right below me. After I put the camera away, I swear one popped up directly below me and looked me in the eye.

Social distancing is easy when there’s no one out there.